David Reinbold Defines Hipster

David Reinbold from Scott Hull Associates portrait of hipster David Reinbold sends over images from his sketchbooks from time to time. But this grouping caught my eye and curiosity. What was Dave thinking? This is his reply:

“I was in a Thrift Shop a month ago looking for some summer shirts. While browsing, I noticed a young man in his late 20’s looking intently at an old sport coat. He was dressed interestingly enough that he received attention by everyone in the store but didn’t seem interested in the slightest attention he was getting. The word ‘Hip’ came to mind when I saw the way he was dressed. The closest I have ever come to being ‘Hip’ may have been in College. As a ‘Visual Art’ Major we were always looked at as a bit weird, not to say that ‘Hipsters’ are weird. We were out of the mainstream of the college community and as I remember I wore flannel shirts and what was called ‘work’ shirts which were made of a jean like material a faded blue color and cuffed khaki pants at one point and black polished shoes. lol. I was not considered a ‘Hipster' then, perhaps a ‘Hippie’ maybe because of the length my hair.”

So Dave, why “hipster”? “I believe the word Hipster may be from the late 30’s and 40’s where the terms ‘Hip' and ‘Hep' were coined as they pertained to Jazz music and musicians.”

“I do listen to Jazz and a lot of music that was not considered mainstream. In the definition of ‘Hipster' the age demographic is 20’s - 30’s so I am wayyyyy beyond the ‘Hipster’ stage at this point. And I would not look good dressing that way now. But I do have a fascination for what that ‘Culture’ is or might be in 2015. So these Drawings are a result of that curiosity.

Enjoy!

David Reinbold from Scott Hull Associates of hipster flannel and summer

David Reinbold from Scott Hull Associates hipster portrait

David Reinbold from Scott Hull Associates on hipsters Another Definition Hipster -- Bing Crosby was considered ‘HIP’.

Hipster or hepcat, as used in the 1940s, referred to aficionados of jazz, in particular bebop, which became popular in the early 1940s. The hipster adopted the lifestyle of the jazz musician, including some or all of the following: dress, slang, use of cannabisand other drugs, relaxed attitude, sarcastic humor, self-imposed poverty and relaxed sexual codes.

The hipster is an underground man. He is to the Second World War what the dadaist was to the first. He is amoral, anarchistic, gentle, and overcivilized to the point of decadence. He is always ten steps ahead of the game because of his awareness, an example of which might be meeting a girl and rejecting her, because he knows they will date, hold hands, kiss, neck, pet, fornicate, perhaps marry, divorce—so why start the whole thing? He knows the hypocrisy of bureaucracy, the hatred implicit in religions—so what values are left for him? — except to go through life avoiding pain, keep his emotions in check, and after that, "be cool," and look for kicks. He is looking for something that transcends all this bullshit and finds it in jazz.

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