Scott Hull Associates

World Cup Passion+Danielle Evans

June 29, 2014

I’ve been playing soccer since the tender age of six, and in recent years have only dreamed of doing official work for the World Cup, the pinnacle of global sportsmanship.

Nike’s now twelve year old World Cup slogan, Joga Bonito, a slightly altered expression from soccer god Pele that means both “Play Beautifully” and “The Beautiful Game”, inspired me to do just that.

To commemorate Brazil’s Cup hosting, I chose yellow shoes and green paper and over the course of three days twirled two very long shoelaces into letters and trills. The laces were bought on spools, and due to their tight weave were perfectly malleable yet firm. I added lace covers in post, otherwise the piece retained most of its original charm and magic.


Danielle Evans

May 18, 2014

Matt Houston is Definitely Not Boring.

May 1, 2014

“Don’t be boring, think about it, new, cool, strange”

This is the mantra Scott Hull’s newest artist, Matt Houston lives by. Especially relevant as this applies to his love of creating new and exciting imagery.

Matt describes his work as, “simple, cartoony, graphic and usually flat. It is filled with fantastic creatures, strange plants, strewn with rare items and covered with a lovingly hand-drawn crust.

Matt’s resume includes everything from editorial illustration, t-shirt designs and children’s books to character design for “Adventure Times”.

His world is filled with his wife and their new baby, making shirts, drawing all night, and hoping for fulfillment as he works toward a great, creative future.

Matt is definitely not boring.
…………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………..
The Chango + Matt Houston

The Chango assignment was about “Big Data” and while contemplating the wonder of big data and the skilled people and technology that make it possible, I kept thinking about a quote from Arthur C. Clarke; “Any sufficiently advanced technology is indistinguishable from magic.”

So I went a magical route, or at least fantastical. The crystal ball represents big data and the insights and knowledge it provides, and all of the small figures doing their parts to carry the cord to plug into the crystal ball to feed it with information represent the various professionals who make it all happen.


……………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………..
Esquire Russia + Matt Houston

Esquire Russia likes to have foreign artists interpret current events in Russia so I included the following events:

- Putin’s public approval rating hits five-year record high poll
- Official results: 97 percent of Crimea voters back joining Russia
- Russia lost 20 billion rubbles because of launch failures of space vehicle
- The inhabitant of the Pskov area detained fro burning of “witch”
- A granddaughter with her friends robbed her grandmother in Vladivostok
- Woman killed her boyfriend in Perm pushing a romote in his mouth


………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………
Long Island Pulse + Matt Houston

The Long Island Pulse pieces were about looking ahead optimistically to changing markets, so I had a lot of “above the storm” and “looking forward” imagery in the form of clouds, rain, mountains, walls, ladders, telescopes, etc.


Andrea Eberbach Lands 4 Illustrations in Communication Arts Annual

April 30, 2014

Scott Hull Associates is proud to announce that four illustrations of Andrea Eberbach’s were chosen to appear in the Communication Art 55th Illustration Annual.

The organization, Heroes Foundation, generously enabled Andrea and Bonnie Maurer to publish The Reconfigured Goddess, Poems of a Breast Cancer Survivor. Andrea commented, “my hope is that it inspires and helps heal all those affected by this disease.”

Andrea Eberbach’s art in this book really addressed the idea of “healing the whole person”– physically, psychologically, socially and spiritually.


…………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………..

…………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………….

…………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………….

………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………


Meg Hunt Helps Jamie Oliver Magazine in the Garden

April 29, 2014

Not every world-famous chef would have a Gardening section in his magazine, but Jamie Oliver certainly does. In fact, he has his own gardener – Peter Wrapson – and Jamie Magazine art director Adrienne Pitts was determined to reflect Peter’s passion for gardening with the perfect illustration.

“Gardening appears in the front of the magazine with a lot of newsy items surrounding it,” she explains. “As such, the pages really need to sing out – be colorful, attention grabbing, and beautiful.” And, because of the broad range of topics covered from issue to issue, Adrienne needed an illustrator who could illustrate not only food, but also “plants, people, activities, inanimate objects… The list goes on!” With Meg Hunt, she knew she’d found her girl.

“This section has become an ongoing job for Meg, as her colorful style and attention to detail really combine to create illustrations that jump off the page. Some of the topics are a little tricky, but she always comes up with charming and detailed works that enhance the words on the page. She’s a delight to work with and strengthens the visual brand of our magazine.”


……………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………..

……………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………..

………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………


Tremendouness a New Explanatory Video For TED ED

April 22, 2014

Hey, hey! Tremendousness just finished a collaboration with Ted Ed and Dr. Robert Lustig. The piece is another video about the health dangers of added sugars and how sugar hides in plain sight by using aliases to disguise itself.

While sugar is easy to spot in candy, soft drinks and ice cream, it also hides out in foods you might not expect—including peanut butter, pasta sauce and even bologna! Robert Lustig decodes confusing labels and sugar’s many aliases to help determine just how much of that sweet carbohydrate makes its way into our diets.

YouTube Preview Image

Journal Post: The New Consumer Dialogue

April 22, 2014

Like all good thought leaders, over the years I have filled over 30 moleskine journals. Each journal with ideas, notes and sketches in order to map out concepts for helping individuals, groups and organizations to bridge the culture of a visual life.

Why keep a joural in today’s electric world? To keep secrets from your computer.


Michael Bast + Landor = New Sour Patch Characters

April 18, 2014


…………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………….


……………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………..

Why would you refresh an iconic brand like Sour Patch to remain relevant? That was the question asked to Landor’s Dale Doyle. “Some brands do it to combat copycats, others refresh only when introducing a new variant. Sour Patch refreshed its package to avoid look-alikes and breathe new life into the brand. Before starting the project, the team mined the brand’s equities by identifying what was important to stakeholders. They took time to understand how the brand differentiated from the competition and how it didn’t.”

What was the Sour Patch brand’s ownable equities? Sour Patch characters. So Landor’s team enlisted the help of Scott Hull Associates’food illustrator, Michael Bast to help with the creation of a new cast of Sour Patch characters.

The new realistic animated Sour Patch characters draw the concumer in to the store’s shelf.

Making the decision to either slightly refresh your package or to a major overhaul depends on the health of your brand. Dale commented that we often see brands that have been declining over the years, yet are hesitant to implement a packaging redesign. Today brands need to continually advance forward to remain relevant. If you think of your brand’s packaging as the living, breathing way in which your product is brought to life, then continually evolving your package makes ROI sense.
…………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………….


Mikey Burton Draws 35 Pairs of Custom Converse All-Stars (Time-Lapes)

April 15, 2014

Converse asked Mikey Burton to draw on 30+ pairs of shoes for Nordstrom. It took Mikey an entire week, and here’s the time-lapse to prove it. View the entire collection here on Nordstrom’s blog.

………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………….


Scott asks the question “Where do ideas come from?”

April 8, 2014

Teachable Moment

A brilliant idea can change your life. Just ask Steve Jobs. And think about it – how would one incredible idea affect your work? How would it affect your personal creating? Your career? Your confidence and opportunities?

These days, new ideas aren’t just inspiring; they’re essential. A narrow-gauge mindset doesn’t work in modern business. Consumers aren’t loyal to cheap commodities. No, they love the remarkable, the human, the unique. And those ideas don’t just fall from the sky. (Usually.)

So where do they originate? Since Scott Hull Associates is in the business of ideas, I figured our artists ought to know. They surprised me with their answers, citing everything from “cross-pollinating synergetic associations” to cracks in the driveway. Enjoy.
-Scott

Aren’t you silly…Ideas come from the stork, just like babies. – Andrea Eberbach

From an ever expanding and curious mind. –Von Glitschka

I’m not sure where they come from, but I’m pretty sure – starting in 2012 – that there will be a federal tax on them. -Mark Riedy

Personally, I group them into two broad categories: surprise ideas and task-oriented ideas. There’s an enormous area of interaction and cross-pollination between these, but if I think about it, most everything I do whether art-related, fixing a faucet or otherwise, fits somewhere in the continuum. In the area of ideas for art, surprise! Ideas are just that — out of nowhere, triggered by who-knows-what…smells, memories, dreams, emotions, even stress. Task-oriented ideas are usually, at least for me, more forced and rarely complete at the beginning — they need refinement and tuning, and the trick is to retain something good and fresh enough to keep through that refinement process. Most won’t make it to the end, and many aren’t worth fooling around with from the beginning, but each has to be weighed before discarding. Working in collaboration with commercial clients, most illustration ideas are going to be task-driven, and will be a blend of your ideas and the client’s regarding concept, style and desired results.

Somewhere in here also has to be addressed the impact of original vs. derivative ideas. For a visual artist and especially one working commercially, purely original ideas are hard to come by. We’re bombarded by visual imagery from the first day we open our eyes, then later are drawn to and/or repelled by most everything we see that other artists have done – this can’t help but affect our style and how we see the world through art. How we control and channel our own likes, dislikes and influences through our work, all the while adding whatever personal flavoring we bring to the equation determines how original our artistic solutions will be. Recognizing and utilizing influences is a balancing act that’s always there when generating ideas.

Lastly, I think ideas spring from that overused word, passion. It’s why we do what we do instead of pursuing any of the millions of other occupations available in the world. Speaking only for myself, I want to add my spin and polish to whatever visual problem is put in front of me, as long as it’s something that I can relate to. Generating good ideas is more often than not hard work, and the effort needs to be applied where it will do the most good both for the artist and for the resulting work. -John Maggard

A mysterious internal response to an ever-changing external set of chance meetings. -Lorraine Tuson

My ideas come from nature. I am an avid gardener and I am always in awe of the design found in natural things. The hardest part of drawing nature is keeping its fresh and random quality. I love taking a natural theme (such as shells), and combining the many shapes and textures to create patterns. -Lisa Ballard

Ideas come from playing. -Penelope Dullaghan

Ideas are the result of a wide open mind that is always asking the question “What if?”. After that, getting a few other people’s opinions will often make them better. Scott Matthews

The most common comment I hear when asked this is, “ideas are everywhere”. But to me that’s a cop-out because our society cannot see the forest through the trees. For me ideas come from staring at the stars, or a plant in the crack on the driveway. Yes, the Internet is also full of useful images, but where does one start? Back to the basics, I say! For me this is an endless journey, because problem solving is a passion of mine. -Geoffrey P Smith

Ideas come from doing, not planning. The best ideas I’ve ever had came to me in the process of making creative work, not from sitting down and intellectualizing my next move. -Grant Gilliland

Now that’s a good question! Ideas are a kind of cross-pollination of thought and problem parameters that comes from combining one or more unlike things to create a third, more synergetic association. It starts with research; I look through information relevant to the problem at hand, making lists of items and key words that can drive the direction of thought. Next, I take the information and start to play with it without judgment – it’s called free association. I take some of these key words or essential elements from the lists and literally connect them to see if there’s a potential association there. For example, if you take the word magnet and library and think about what associations they make, you come up with a series of thought-play ideas. I’m hoping for some kind of visual metaphor or analogy that will help communicate the concept of whatever it is I’m trying to get across. So… Library+Magnet=What? I think of a place where information storage plus some kind of pulling force comes together. The human brain would be considered a a kind of information storage unit and the attractive force might be a lighted billboard sign. Or the Rosetta stone, the key to interpreting several dead languages, might have Space Odyssey monolith-like properties that attract the monkeys.

Once all of the play is done, it’s time to see which of the ideas might have merit for the problem at hand. Maybe some that are seemingly way off base will lead to something else by association. This is the portion of the event that we must judge or deem relevant to solving the problem. That, and a healthy amount of sketching, usually bring good results. -Larry Moore